Fact-checkers say Casten “falls short in basic math”

After months of Sean Casten misleading voters about the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the Chicago Sun-Times and Politifact set the record straight, ruling Casten’s claims that many local residents would pay more in taxes “FALSE” and saying he fumbled basic math, big time.

The Casten campaign has been tacking fliers on doors all over the district, threatening voters that their tax bill will go up and saying that Peter Roskam “should take a math class.” But the Sun-Times and Politifact crunched the numbers and backed up Roskam: the average Hinsdale family of four will receive $5,000 in tax savings, not a tax increase of more than $19,000 like Casten has been telling Hinsdale voters.

The same flawed math renders Casten’s other town-specific claims of tax increases false—in fact, in each of the jurisdictions known to receive a Casten claim of increase, IRS data shows the average family will actually receive a tax benefit thanks to the new law.

READ THE FULL FACT-CHECK HERE.

“Sean Casten has placed alarming, official looking tax notices on local residents’ doors misleading voters into thinking they will face huge tax increases and was caught spreading misinformation—with debunked numbers and no support for his baseless claims,” said Roskam for Congress Spokesman Veronica Vera. “For example, the data shows the average Hinsdale family of four will keep $5,000 more of their hard-earned money thanks to the recent tax cuts. That’s not even close to the more than $19,000 tax increase Casten has been trying to scare those voters with. The same flaws are present in Casten’s claims about the impact of the tax cuts on other communities in the district too. It’s time for Sean Casten to stop trying to scare voters with, as the Sun-Times and Politifact observed, “FALSE” information.”

# # #